Urmee Chowdhury, Tracy Washington & Debra Cushing

Urmee Chowdhury

PhD Candidate, Queensland University of Technology, Queensland Australia

Urmee Chowdhury is a PhD candidate in the School of Architecture and Built Environment at Queensland University of Technology, Australia. Chowdhury's research is focused on adults' park use behaviours in neighbourhood park settings. Chowdhury has experience in academia and practice in the field of architecture in Bangladesh and has several publications on different urban issues in Dhaka City. She is also a full member of the Institute of Architects, Bangladesh, and Bangladesh Institute of Planners.,

Dr Tracy Sherwood Washington

Lecturer, Queensland University of Technology, Queensland Australia

Dr Tracy Sherwood Washington is a lecturer in Urban and Regional Planning, School of Built Environment in the faculty of Science and Engineering at QUT. Tracy is an Exercise Physiologist with research interests in the built environment and health outcomes. Her transdisciplinary research focuses on policy and enhancing the ways in which environments support active and healthy living. Her current research includes an Australian Research Council Linkage grant evaluating physical activity levels and park design in the Moreton Bay region.,

Dr Debra Cushing

Associate Professor, Queensland University of Technology, QueenslandAustralia

Dr. Cushing's research combines her interest in healthy and supportive environments for children and youth with her understanding of using design theory and research evidence to create sustainable and vibrant landscapes. Deb is currently an Associate Professor in Landscape Architecture and the Spatial Discipline Leader (Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Interior Architecture study areas) for the School of Design. She is also a researcher with the QUT Design Lab and the Centre for the Environment.

Presentation:

Applying GIS-based Methodology to Explore Spatial Behaviour Patterns of Adult Park Users in Suburban Neighbourhood Parks

Neighbourhood parks act as important community public spaces for leisure and social activities, providing opportunities for people to connect with others. This study focused on the behaviour patterns of adults (younger adults, mid-aged adults, and older adults) in two suburban neighbourhood park settings in the Moreton Bay Region of Southeast Queensland, Australia. The observational study explored how the different aged adults effectively used the park spaces and amenities, collecting data on two weekdays and two weekends. The data has been analysed using GIS-based behaviour mapping and descriptive methods to produce visual maps showing spatial patterns of movement, and usage in different park spaces. The findings demonstrate that GIS mapping allows for a better understanding of park users' behaviours and this information can act as a design guidance tool for designing park environments that promote park use for varying age groups.



Registration & Booking

Key Dates

Registration flat fee

Until 8 September

Program Launch

Mid June

PLA 2021

12-15 September

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